IndyFringe: Gloria Mundi

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden and Wendy Carson

Gloria (Kayla Jo Pulliam) is not having a good day. She is an addict, out on parole and living in a halfway house. Last night an angel, Harold (Bryson Kramer), came to give her the news that she is to be the parent of the new child of God. When she tells her ex, Jody (Cameron Pride) this “happy” news, is it any wonder he,* and social worker Harold (Kramer), suspect she is using again?

This sets the plot of “Gloria Mundi,” Pamela Morgan’s tale of recovery, parenting, relationships, and faith presented by Nomad Theater Company under the direction of Ashleigh Rae-Lynn.

Morgan and company have created a story that is full of hilarious moments (“the doughnuts have suffered the consequences”) and heartbreaking emotion (the fate of Lanie, Gloria’s first child).

“Don’t f*** it up this time,” angelic Harold advises, and it’s possible that Gloria already has. Through twists both dramatic and funny, we’re taken on a wild ride that ends in a miracle of hope no one expects.

Witness this blessed event, 5:15 p.m. today (as we post this) and 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3-4, at the District Theatre.

(*EDIT: Character’s pronouns are he/they, we were informed by Morgan after this initially posted, and pronoun and name spelling have been updated.)

IndyFringe: Dadbod

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By Wendy Carson

Local standup comic Brad Hinshaw has once again managed to escape his wife and kids (and not just by hiding in the bathroom) to come out and spend time with actual adults again, bringing another hour of family-centric comedy (not to be confused with “family-friendly,” some words would be bleeped on TV).

Hinshaw returns to further refine his act, “Dadbod,” in anticipation of filming it. While most of his material is the same as last year’s show – if you haven’t heard about the joy of “lactation cookies,” you really should – the newer stories are hilarious. Who knew the dangers of toddlers and super soakers?

As I said last year, this is a delightfully relatable show for parents and non-parents alike. So, take the chance to escape your own family so you can laugh at yourself as well as Hinshaw’s situations.

Today’s performance (as we post this) is 1:45 p.m., and the last is 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 4, both at the cabaret stage of the District Theatre.

IndyFringe: Fret Knot

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

First, I must note that comparisons to the comedy duo Garfunkel and Oates are inevitable. Madeline Wilson and Lizzie Kaneicki do seem to have the same schtick, sharing the stage – Wilson with ukulele, Kaneicki with guitar – and perform hilarious songs about life and relationships, but does that other pair of funny women present their shared love of crochet, and literally get tied to and tangled up in their hobby as the show progresses? Afraid not, so “Fret Knot.”

No copycats here – Wilson (originally from Phoenix, according to Facebook) and Kaneicki (from West Virginia) joined forces in Chicago, and with friends perform comedy with music biweekly as “Hahaha Lalala”,* so they are quite capable of bringing the funny as their own entertaining act.

Taking them on their own terms – funny bits, singly or together, about odd taco runs, upset housecats, and all – includes some poetry and storytelling, engaging a range of both emotion and talent. We get the downside of summer birthdays, the peril of intrusive thoughts, and the comforting power of mathematics.

The yarn metaphor is literally all over the place – don’t get too caught up in it. But it does help give the show a “something different” Fringe-y vibe, and at one point the audience does help increase their entanglement.

Having blown in from the Windy City for one weekend, you can see and enjoy “Fret Knot” 8:45 p.m. today (as we post this) and 1:45 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3-4, at the cabaret stage of the District Theatre.

For Chicago performances, they are presently at the Bughouse Theater.

(*Find them on Instagram, Google search has a cacophony of unrelated “ha” and “la”s if you hunt there.)

IndyFringe: Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

The title of the show — “Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind” — is never said in the 24 tiny plays presented by UIndy Theatre Company at the District Theatre. To be more accurate, it is: “Too Much Time Makes the Audience Get Cookies.”

The series, “neo-futurist plays” by Greg Allen performed by UIndy students Elisabeth Enderle, Nick Finch, Audrey Panyard, and Kelli Thomas, are represented by cards numbered 1-24 at the back of the stage. The audience chooses the order, so the show is different every time.

The topic and form of each vary widely, from funny to absurd to introspective to disturbing to deadly serious. There’s also a bit of audience participation within the action. And remember, “Play 23” does not exist.

For anyone who remembers my write-up on this last year, apologies for the self-plagiarism. This is still one of the hottest tickets at the Fringe, with some new micro-plays in the mix, all excellently executed by this talented foursome. Their comic timing is great, but overall “timing”? Well, it’s hard to get this many scenes done in 48 minutes (an average of 2 minutes per play). The performance I saw this year clocked in at 49:50 — we got cookies!

Remaining performances are 3:30 p.m. Saturday and 5:15 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 3-4.

IndyFringe: The Ballad of Blade Stallion

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By Wendy Carson

Matt Kramer and the troupe at Defiance Comedy have brought us another kooky laugh-fest for our enjoyment. From the opening scene of “The Ballad of Blade Stallion” – in which yoga balls are bounced upon to simulate spaceships – you know to expect a silly great time.

Having been hired to retrieve the only copy of some very important secret plans (Who doesn’t make a copy?) as well as a kidnapped girl, Astria (Emily Bohannon), Blade Stallion (*sting* “Blade Stallion!”) sets off to get his paycheck.

Stallion (Zack Joyce) was not aware of the choreography included in his theme song, but manages to make it through that obstacle, only to find that he must also babysit two young children once he gets to his ship.

Cobalt (John Kern) and Skye (Rachelle Martin) are not only familiar with his legend, they feel he might even be “Space Jesus.” As much as Stallion hates telling stories, he manages to control the kids somewhat by telling them his backstory.

We learn he was raised by witches, as well as the origins of his Space Nemesis, The Dandelorian (Clay Mabbitt). This chapter also introduces us to his fellow Space Pirate Academy graduates: cyborg Ann Droid (Meg McLane), with whom he shares a sordid love; and Bando (Kelsey VanVoorst), an anthropomorphic feline who may or may not have his best interests at heart.

Add to this a lot of crazy songs, improbable plot twists, the entire cast milking every bit of humor out of the entire script, and some bizarre characters thrown in, and you have another typically hilarious Defiance show.

Witness the marvel that is “The Ballad of Blade Stallion (Blade Stallion!)” at the District Theatre, 5:30 p.m. Thursday and 8:45 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 1 and 3.

IndyFringe: IndyProv Presents ‘Our Favorite Fringe Artists’

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By Wendy Carson

This year, the minds at IndyProv have decided to amp up their comedic prowess and invite performers from various other IndyFringe shows to join them onstage for their improvised comedy performances.

The visiting guests are different for every performance (the cast of “Ship of Dreams” joined them when I attended) so you can return and see a completely unique show each time. IndyProv has also embraced the modern age by having audience members text in their prompts rather than write them on pieces of paper.

The show consists of various improv games (some of which were new to me) which highlight all of the various acting and comedic chops of the cast. One thing I did find, when giving the players a subject, activity, or item, sometimes the most ordinary things can provide more inspired fun.

So, be sure to catch their next show(s). It’s a fun time for (almost) all of the family.*

“IndyProv Presents: Our Favorite Fringe Artists” takes the District Theatre stage 5:30 p.m. Friday and 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 2-3.

(*Some adult language; you know how actors get.)

IndyFringe: Jewel Box Revue 2022

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

Tom Alvarez and Dustin Klein’s Magic Thread Cabaret celebrates the past and showcases today’s talent with Jewel Box Revue 2022 at the District Theatre.

The original Revue toured nationally and internationally from 1936 to 1999, featuring live-singing “female impersonators” and a “male impersonator” – what we now call drag queens and kings. With their widespread appeal and fame, as Alvarez notes, “these pioneers were among the first to crack open the closet door.”

Today’s jewels are Miss Pearl (Keith Potts), Miss Sapphire (Isaiah Moore), Miss Opal (Ervin Gainer) and Miss Ruby (Jim Melton); with emcee Danny Diamond (Kelsey VanVoorst); dancers and co-choreographers Topaz (Xavier Medina) and Jade (Jade Perry); and sparkling on-stage musicians Galen Morris on bass, Matthew Dupree on drums, and music director Klein on piano.

Alvarez wrote and directed the show, featuring songs from Broadway and past greats.

Among the various numbers: Potts is exquisite in delivering the Judy Garland hit “The Man That Got Away” as well as “The Ladies Who Lunch” from the musical “Company.” Moore has us feeling Etta James’ “At Last.” Opal gives proper sass to Pearl Bailey’s “You Can Be Displaced.” Melton is arousing with “Don’t Tell Mama” from “Cabaret” and inviting with Rosemary Clooney’s “C’mon-a My House.” Even VanVoorst gets into the act, challenging Potts with “Anything You Can Do.”

Wendy and I were fortunate to get into a sold-out audience. It’s recommended you act fast to get in to see this marvelous show, 7:15 p.m. Thursday or 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 1-2.

IndyFringe: Amaze & Amuse

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

Trino, who appeared on television in “Masters of Illusion,” brings his “Modern Day Magic Show” to the District Theatre stage.

With “Amaze and Amuse,” we learn animals like to dress up as balloon dogs, how to do a trick (sorta) and that no matter how long you’re married, you still misplace a sock in the laundry.

Also, one lucky audience member gets a prize, and Trino finishes by escaping a straitjacket he wears “under water.”

This all-ages hour of silly jokes and interesting illusions starts its final IndyFringe performance just minutes after I post this, but we can hope Trino returns to “Amaze and Amuse” us at a future date.

IndyFringe: The Session

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

Taylor Martin has been involved in every year of IndyFringe, and he keeps up this streak with “Taylor Martin’s Indy Magic presents: THE SESSION.”

The concept is, as he puts it, “four magicians walk into a bar…” Basically, at the District Theatre cabaret stage, it’s like we’re looking in on a corner table of some establishment where the magicians relax while Taylor brings in bags of random objects in CVS bags, which they start to play with, including the famous yard-long drug store receipt. As they can’t help themselves, they also ask anyone else in the room to help with some of the tricks.

Because one of the scheduled performers, “mind reader” Brendon Ware, took off for sunny Spain for a job opportunity (seriously!), there were just three magicians when I attended: Martin, Mastermind Jim Keplinger, and The Amazing Barry. At today’s performance (as we post this), he is joined by Fringe favorite Cody Clark to round out the foursome.

The more laid-back concept allows for a playful approach to magic, including how loose paper and cups can make a quick and easy routine that not only impresses your employer, but also your future wife. Barry gives a famous example of “don’t try this at home,” and Keplinger does a couple of mentalist tricks that Taylor told me later even has him astounded.

If this performance comes to your event, don’t be shy about joining on the fun when asked. (A 10-ish year-old boy from my audience nearly stole the show.) And no matter how many times you’ve seen Taylor manipulate soft foam balls right before your eyes, you’ll still find yourself losing track to everyone’s amusement, including your own.

A little storytelling, a little dazzle, and a few ruined playing cards mark “The Session” which wrapped its IndyFringe run today, but will no doubt convene again. Follow facebook.com/IndyMagicMonthly for information.

IndyFringe: The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

This is part of IndyFringe 2022, Aug. 18-Sept. 4 (individual performance times vary) in downtown Indianapolis. Details and tickets at IndyFringe.org.

By John Lyle Belden

Essentially, if you see a Fringe performance listed as being by Carmel High School theatre department, just go see it. I’ve now seen four of their professional-quality IndyFringe offerings, and I am still in awe of their 2018 show.

This production, “The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” is a fairly new play (likely an Indiana premiere) by Dwayne Hartford based on the 2006 award-winning children’s book by Kate DiCamillo.

On Egypt Street of an American city in the 1930s, little Abilene (Kate Sullivan) is given a fine china rabbit by her grandmother Pelligrina (Madison Alig). Abilene names him Edward Tulane, and adores him – as she should, the self-centered rabbit thinks. The spoiled, well-dressed rabbit silently makes demands that apparently only Pelligrina can hear, so she tells Abilene a bedtime story for Edward to also hear, a dark tale that puzzles the china toy.

Then, during a sea cruise, Edward falls overboard and his long journey begins. He becomes “Susanna,” the proxy child of a fisherman (Micah Phillips) and his wife (Sullivan); “Malone,” the companion and keeper of secrets for hobo Bull (Phillips) and his dog Lucy (Eden Hammond); “Clyde,” the scarecrow on the farm of an Old Lady (Alig); and “Jangles,” the treasured dancing doll of doomed Sarah Ruth (Juliet Malherbe, also our Narrator) and her loving brother Bryce (Sam Tiek), who makes him kick to his harmonica playing for nickels on the streets of Memphis, Tenn. However, an angry diner owner (Aaron Young) brings the journey to an abrupt end.

At last, Edward sits in a doll-shop window, older and repaired – but wiser? As the novel says, “If you have no intention of loving or being loved, then the whole journey is pointless.”

The play features a recurring song, “North Star,” by student director Ella Asher with Sarah Warf and Micah Phillips. Eden Hammond choreographed bits of movement. And an on-stage musician, Seth Jacobsen, strums the guitar and expresses Edward’s thoughts.

This Hans Christian Anderson-esque story with rich thematic layers and childlike wonder is excellently rendered by the teen cast and crew. Adapted to under an hour from a full-length 80-minute play, this production does not feel rushed or missing any pieces – like with Edward, the cracks don’t show. This is essential viewing for all children and kids-at-heart.

One performance remains, 1:45 p.m. today (as we post this), Saturday, Aug. 27, at the District Theatre.