‘Anne’ charms Bloomington stage

By John Lyle Belden

Life can be frustrating when you’ve got a big wild imagination and you are stuck in an orphanage or foster home doing chores and taking care of others. But suddenly, your dreams start to come true!

This is how we meet “Anne of Green Gables,” in a production of Constellation Stage & Screen (formerly Cardinal Stage) at Waldron Auditorium in Bloomington. The play by Catherine Bush adapts and condenses the celebrated Lucy Maud Montgomery novel to a quick-paced movie-length act perfect for the various children and tweens in the audience, just a little younger than the red-haired girl – played by IU student Alexa Norbeck – arriving at the village of Avonlea in beautiful Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Anne (don’t forget the “e”) is to live at Green Gables farm with late-middle-age siblings Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert (Greg Simons and Maria Walker). They had planned on adopting a boy, but before the error can be corrected, Anne charms her way into their lives. The cast also includes Mia Siffin as dramatic busybody Rachel Lynde and Diana, Anne’s “bosom friend;” David Hosei as Gilbert, Anne’s scholastic rival and enemy for mocking her hair; and Kenny Hertling in other roles, including teacher Mr. Phillips.

Norbeck presents Anne as a wild-eyed romantic, a bit melodramatic and prone to renaming things when what they were called seems too plain, but also relatable as she takes on life lessons without losing an ounce of her spirit. Siffin is a study of contrasts, wildly over-the-top to the delight of younger audience members as Rachel, yet sweet and best-friendly as Diana. Hosei presents Gilbert as a regular boy – not mean in his teasing and slowly finding he likes this smart and special girl, if she would only forgive him. Simons portrays a respectful father-figure, discovering the closest he would ever get to a daughter. Walker has an arc of growth in Marilla, as she learns that strict upbringing might not be best for the fire-haired force of nature she has come to love.

Direction is by Mallory Metoxen. The clever stage design by Erin Gautille is also noteworthy, made up of wooden boxes decorated like children’s toy blocks with furniture and other features painted on the sides.

Like the book, this play is fine for all ages, wonderful for children. Performances run through Nov. 27; get info and tickets at seeconstellation.org.