Bard Fest: CTC makes ‘Much Ado’ really something

This Show is part of Bard Fest, central Indiana’s annual Shakespeare festival. Info and tickets at www.bardfestindy.com.

By John Lyle Belden

For those who tire of Shakespeare plays being set in all manner of different times and places, good news – Carmel Theatre Company’s production of the comedy “Much Ado About Nothing” retains its original setting of 1600s Italy. But for those who don’t want to see every random character and hear every scripted word (raises hand) this play has undergone some gentle editing, adapted by director Laura Kuhn, sparing us from the sprawl of characters the Bard typically populates his comedies with.

With easy to follow cast and plot, and sharply delivered lines, we get an entertaining romp that often has the feel of a TV sitcom. This establishes itself from the beginning, as returning soldier Benedick (Steve Kruze), whose wit is as sharp as his sword, starts verbal sparring with Beatrice (Christine Kruze), a slightly less cynical version of Kate from “Taming of the Shrew.” They each have such a disdain for love and marriage that – well, you can guess what’s in store for them.

But the big love story is Count Claudio (Jeffrey Bird) who longs to woo the maiden Hero (Elysia Rohn). His BFF Don Pedro (Matt Anderson) arranges the match, but Pedro’s sister Donna Joanna (Amanda Bell) doesn’t like it when people are happy – especially her brother – and sets out to ruin the impending marriage. She nearly succeeds, but this is a comedy.

The actors so far listed deliver brilliantly, as well as Tony Johnson as Hero’s father Leonato, David Whicker as his brother Antonio, Jarrett Yates as Don Pedro’s servant Balthasar, Leah Hodson as Hero’s attendant Margaret, Dustin Miller and Manny Casillas as Donna Joanna’s minions Borachio and Conrade, Daniel Young as Friar Francis, and Jim Mellowitz as the Sexton. As for Jim Maratea as Constable Dogberry, as his partner Verges (Guy Grubbs) would mark it at the appropriate time that he is “an ass,” his gaily executed performance takes his comic foil role to its limits.

Even for one like me who has seen a few “Much Ados” this earnest production delivers, with much laughter and appropriate melodrama. The scenes where one character listens in on others’ conversations are gems of physical comedy. The costumes looked perfect, but the set a bit too solidly built – hopefully they can find a way to smooth the scene changes by the second weekend.

As the play’s title implies, what doesn’t seem that big a deal becomes literally life-and-death situations. We laugh at those old-time attitudes, but one honest look at the Internet shows we’re never immune from the drama.

Remaining performances are 7:30 p.m. Friday, 1:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 5-7 at the IndyFringe Basile Theatre, 719 E. St. Clair, just east of the College and Mass Ave. intersection.

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